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Welcome to Hill Reeves, a blog where I write about the things I cook and bake in NYC.

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Sukiyaki Soba

Sukiyaki Soba

Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves-8.jpg
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves
Sukiyaki Soba - Hill Reeves

It's been a normal week of work, work, work. Luckily, I love work! Do I talk about it much? I work for a foodtech startup here in New York City called Chicory. We developed the technology to make recipes shoppable--see that lil button beneath the list of ingredients on my site (and on Food & Wine and on lots of other sites)? That's us! Click it and see what it's all about!

I work with a handful of other twenty-somethings and we get along great. Maybe too well? Like, last night a handful of us ate BonChon and sang karaoke together. We watched the Fourth of July fireworks together. We're yellow hearts on Snapchat with each other. And a couple weekends ago, I went up to Westchester with a couple o' dem colleagues. It was great cause i got to go to the mall and eat hot dogs and listen to Hot 97 while we drove around, among many other suburban things. But the main event, and the reason for going up there in the first place was to cook with Yuni (our CEO/Co-Founder) and his mom, Yoko. 

I'd heard for over a year about how incredible Yoko's cooking was. She was up for making whatever I wanted, so I requested somethin Japanese. And I was clueless after that since I order katsu or okonomiyaki the second I see it on any menu and rarely look beyond those bbs. She took the lead and walked me through some deceptively simple tempura--yes, she taught me secrets to make it perfectly; no, I won't tell you. And we made sukiyaki!

Sukiyaki consists of thinly sliced rib eye along with lots of other chopped and sliced goodies: mushrooms, tofu, noodles, cabbage, scallions, bitter greens, etc. You cook it in a hot pot at the table, in sukiyaki sauce (soy sauce, sugar, sake, mirin--or you can buy in in a jar like I did) and then dip each bite in beaten, raw egg as you eat it. I ate until I was delirious and then got home and asked when we could do it again. Here's some soba inspired by the day. Thanks, Yoko!!

Sukiyaki Soba

Yield: Serves 2

  • 6 shishito peppers
  • salt
  • 6 bunches baby bok choy
  • 1/2 pint button or shiitake mushrooms
  • 7.05 oz soba
  • 1/2 cup sukiyaki sauce
  • nori
  • sesame seeds
  • wasabi paste
  • 2 eggs (optional)
  • umeboshi (optional)

Cooking Directions

  1. Heat cast iron skillet over high heat. Set a large pot of water to boil.
  2. Add peppers to skillet and cook on all sides, til skin is blistered and pepper is soft and floppy. While they cook, slice bok choy bunches in half, lengthwise. Slice mushrooms. When done, sprinkle peppers with salt and remove from skillet; set aside. Turn heat to medium.
  3. Add bok choy and mushrooms to skillet and cook for a few minutes, until they begin to release moisture. Pour over sukiyaki sauce and let cook and simmer as sauce thickens.
  4. Meanwhile, add soba to boiling water. While that cooks, fill a large bowl with cold water and ice. When soba is al dente, remove from pot with chopsticks or tongs and immediately chill in ice water.
  5. Once bok choy is softened and sauce has thickened, turn off heat on skillet.
  6. Divide noodles between two bowls. Top each with bok choy, mushrooms, shredded nori, sesame seeds, and wasabi to taste.
  7. Crack an egg over the dish while veggies are still hot and stir into pasta. You can also soft boil the egg if you prefer, or leave it out all together. I also added in an umeboshi or two for color!
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